Wednesday, March 10, 2010

See what I mean?

Of course I feel like an idiot when I disagree with Donley & Flisk, but I can't help it.

Here's Joe Nathan's pitching mechanics. He is out with a torn UCL. He is one of those "push off the rubber" guys. How can this NOT drag the elbow behind the hips? The problem starts right in the stance phase, look for yourself. The pelvis is already translating forward, and his arm hasn't moved from his side. Now why the elbow & not the GH joint? Look at his belt line in the acceleration phase. Pelvis is tilted posterior in the frontal plane (backward). He MUST drop the elbow to keep from "dunking the clown" sort of speak.

I actually called Flisk on the phone about this, he never called me back. I asked Phil Donley in person & he doesn't have a problem with this as long as the pitcher's body is anatomically sound.

But...how do you stop a runaway train?

5 comments:

JH said...

I'm going to show my ig'nerns (ignorance) again.

Given the pistures you shared is it merely a matter of starting the sequences sooner so they don't get left behind? The reason I ask is because (to use a G2 term) you have ot load in order to explode right?

OR is he just loading in the wrong plane?

Research with VB players show that those who loaded in the transverse plane had greater velocity at ball contact than those who did not load in the transverse plane.

Just thinking out loud.

Great post Joe!!

PS: So if a pitcher doesn't push off how do they get their momentum started forward?

streetlightz said...

Name me a pitcher in the Big Leagues that doesn't push off the rubber.

Joe Przytula said...

Streetlitz- Roger Clemens, Nolan Ryan, Randy Johnson. Guys that have long careers just don't fly off the rubber like that. I'm telling you, there's something to it!

JH- I agree, you need to get momentum going in the sagittal plane. My argument is keeping the center of gravity back as long as possible. Using G2 terminology, pushing off the rubber causes the shoulder & elbow to go "too deep" into the transformational zone.

If you guys download some pictures of the great javelin throwers, they use the same technique. Because they take a running start, the COG back/momentum forward concept is magnified.

And, never forget the effect the pitcher's mound has on accelerating the COG forward even faster! Yet, if you look at most of the ASMI stuff, they are pitching off of flat ground. Big difference!

JH said...

JOe,

Any insight you can give on conjugate training?

sal m said...

I think a huge problem in baseball, and you can't see it in pictures, are the training programs these guys are following both off- and in-season. imho, misapplication of proper lifting/movement principles are to blame for way too many injuries suffered by MLB'ers.