Monday, April 11, 2011

Ramblings on the "Isolate before Integrate" Philosophy

"Effects of muscle strengthening on vertical jump height: a simulation study."  Bobbert et al, MSSE '94.

In this study, isolation training caused a 20% increase in knee extensor force, BUT caused a 9cm DECREASE in vertical jump height.

Orchard, J., Walt, S., McIntosh, A. and Garlick, D. (2002) Muscle activity during the drop punt kick. In: Science and Football IV. Eds: Sprinks, W., Reilly, T. and Murphy, A. London: Taylor and Francis. 32-43.


Australian footballers have been having a real tough go of it with hamstring strains.  But its a lot more than a strength/flexibility thing.  This study shows they (hamstrings) are not particularly active in the follow through of a kick, as you would think.  They seem to have more of a timing sort of purpose.

I don't mean to beat this topic to death, just saying how tough it is to rock a rhyme thats right on time.

8 comments:

JH said...

Speaking of hamstrings, have you any information regarding Lombard's Principle in relation to the hamstrings specifically??

Joe Przytula said...

Good illustration of isolation vs. integration, muscular vs neuromuscular JH, thanks. I brought this up at my talk at CJW this past Jan. The hamstring is only a good ACL stabilizer when the knee is near that 90 degree angle & its giving that posterior draw on the knee.

Kev said...

Lombard's Principle????? Google is no help on this one.

Joe Przytula said...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lombard's_Paradox

Kev said...

Thanks. Learn something new everyday.

Brian Green said...

I think the isolate to integrate concept is good as a basic athletic development and rehab concept for students. By understanding this first I believe students and new grads get a basic framework for anatomy, kinesiology, etc. in order to think critically whether there are other approaches. However, more studies that demonstrate that the functional outcome is marginalised by this concept it becomes clear that a new path should be considered...

Joe Przytula said...

Well said Brian, as usual. Beginning with the traditional Kendall type approach & expanding. But when I was in school we were exposed to both, as the A.T. program was under the auspices of physical education. So besides Kendall, we were also exposed to motor learning, movement ed., etc. But accepting your premise expands the need for post grad education, that I don't believe the NATA is taking the lead on. Making it affordable & accessible to the rank & file- which I hope I'm doing my part in this blog. Got to stop copycating P.T.

Jonathan said...

As a recent product of the NATA curriculum for graduate education, I agree with Brian in that we were taught isolate to integrate as a stepping stone for critical thinking. Unfortunately to many of my peers leave it at that.

Joe, your blog serves as a great addition and new perspective on rehabilitation and athletic developement for newbies like me. .. .

Thanks